The Muslim and the Mosque

The Muslim and the Mosque
15th Anniversary of the Granada Mosque Celebration
Conference Talk
Saturday, 7th July 2018

The Muslim and the mosque. A man and a building. A man who submits to his Creator and a building where he submits. The primary act of the Muslim, and therefore the human being, is to prostrate to his Lord. It is the time and position when man is closest to the Merciful and his own reality. Among men there are those who accept this and those who reject it. Both reside in the same world, but in a very different manner. The Muslim has a book and an example and strives to live his life according to both, which are in fact one. The kafir, the one who puts a layer between himself and the truth, thinks he knows better, or rather does not want to follow the available guidance, preferring his own opinion. Naturally, there is a bit of both in each, but generally submission or rebellion predominates one or the other. Allah tests each with the other; the Muslim’s Iman and the kafir’s rejection. Continue reading “The Muslim and the Mosque”

Asabiyya

Bedouin cover

Pages 275-6

“At a certain stage the bedouin in their power of growth and expansion, and by a genetic vitalisation denied the passive urban community, begin to identify themselves as a new civic force. A natural need becomes wedded to a higher evaluation, an evaluation of themselves. There emerges among them the most powerful force that social man can experience. It is kinship, but not of blood. It transcends the tribal and the familial. This unification of the group takes them to the Second Stage. Stage Two is defined by Ibn Khaldun with the term ‘Asabiyya’. Asabiyya, normally ‘kinship’, is here used to mark as distinctive the bond, the life and death unifying bond of a brotherhood without blood ties. In the excellent Pléiade edition of ‘The Muqaddima’ its editor and translator calls it ‘esprit de corps’, but it is much more than that, for it has in it also a moral evaluation as in the term ‘Futuwwa’, chivalry or nobility of character. Asabiyya unites men to find the power to act and transform and command. If its motor power is high, its brotherhood is raised higher. If the binding factor (religio – to bind together) is there, that is Divine religion, it is, that being its highest possibility, assured a triumph.”